Ubuntu

systemd strikes again with systemd-resolved...

systemd must be the worst thing ever invented. It started off being a good replacement for old rc startup scripts, but has since evolved into a monstrocity that makes Linux unusable. The latest nonsense is call systemd-resolved. It's apparently there to deal with a local resolver for things that can not support NSS, like Chrome.

Not only does this seems rather silly, for something I clearly do not care about at all, but it's also detrimental when your app does its own resolution. In my case, Apache Traffic Server fails to run its regression when it finds this local resolver ...

The solution was simple for me, just disable this useless systemd service:

$ sudo systemctl disable systemd-resolved.service

 

Hacking: 

Ubuntu upgrades and BTRFS snapshots

One of my VMs is running Ubuntu with BTRFS on the boot disk. During an Ubuntu upgrade, I noticed a significant increase in disk space usage, and it turns out Ubuntu created a snapshot on my BTRFS volumes. Now, this is pretty neat, but once I verified everything was working fine, I wanted to delete the old snapshot. It turned out to be a bit more trickier than I though, but with some help from Sami Haahtinen, I got it to work. First, to list the sub volumes, I did

ubuntu-server (16:07) 3/0 $ sudo btrfs subvolume list /
ID 256 top level 5 path @
ID 257 top level 5 path @home
ID 258 top level 5 path @apt-snapshot-release-upgrade-oneiric-2011-10-13_12:41:44

The next step, which was crucial, is to "mount" the full disk BTRFS is using, without specifying a sub-volume:

ubuntu-server (16:09) 4/0 $ sudo mount /dev/mapper/ubuntu--server-slash /mnt

Your disk name will obviously differ (most likely), but after this, you can now delete this sub-volume:

ubuntu-server (16:09) 5/0 $ cd /mnt
ubuntu-server (16:10) 6/0 $ sudo btrfs subvolume delete '@apt-snapshot-release-upgrade-oneiric-2011-10-13_12:41:44'

Hacking: 

Upgrading Ubuntu from command line

Ubuntu 11.10 was just released, and I eagerly decided to upgrade my "server' VM to "Oneiric Ocelot". My installation has no GUI, so I could not use the normal tools I'd use to do the live upgrade. So instead, I had to figure out the command line tools to use. Now, this is well documented, but is still worthwhile to repeat.

$ sudo apt-get install update-manager-core
$ do-release-upgrade -d

That's pretty much it, just follow the destructions on the screen (oh, and recommended not to do this over an ssh session).

Hacking: 

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